Nevada State Capitol, Carson City, Nevada

The Nevada State Capitol Building

The Nevada State Capitol Building

As part of our continuing quest to visit all 50 of the state capitals we visited the Nevada State Capitol in Carson City, Nevada. Kind of like Arizona we found that the original State Capitol is old (built in 1871) and only houses the Governor’s offices. Originally, the building also held the Supreme Court, Legislature, and state library. All those functions now have their own buildings close to the State Capitol building.

The State Capitol building is currently undergoing refurbishment. Looking at the various plaques on the walls it looks like this has been done several times. Inside we met with a State Capitol Police Officer. He was very friendly and invited us to ask him any questions. He handed us a map and told us we were free to pretty much go wherever we wanted. You might be skeptical of that claim, but it was true. The building was really quite open. They let us go into the offices, sit in the old Supreme Court chairs, and even let us examine the inside of the state safe! Which by the way despite having very heavy doors was very ornate with murals on the outside and inside doors. The only place we couldn’t really go was the old assembly chambers because of the construction. Other than that though everywhere was open.

John at a Legislative Desk

John at a Legislative Desk

The Assembly room was under refurbishment.

The Assembly room was under refurbishment.

"Please arise for the Honorable Chief Justice Pedroza" (yeah right). At first Nevada had three supreme court justices, now they have seven.

“Please arise for the Honorable Chief Justice Pedroza” (yeah right). At first Nevada had three supreme court justices, now they have seven.

Loved how they were able to reuse the door hinges when they remodeled.

Loved how they were able to reuse the door hinges when they remodeled.

A look into the Governors office.

A look into the Governors office.

The safe inside the Secretary of the State's office.

The safe inside the Secretary of the State’s office.

They were really nice and let me look inside the safe. It has a beautiful painting on the inside.

They were really nice and let me look inside the safe. It has a beautiful painting on the inside.

The trim was interesting with all the different minerals found in Nevada.

The trim was interesting with all the different minerals found in Nevada.

AJ in front of the State Capitol building.

AJ in front of the State Capitol building.

The old Senate chambers holds a little museum on the story of the Nevada Capitol.

The old Senate chambers holds a little museum on the story of the Nevada Capitol.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just outside the building is a park with many memorials and other government buildings. The main ones to note were the Nevada State Assembly Building and the Nevada State Supreme Court. The city of Carson City is kind of a mid sized city. Like all Nevada cities, there are casinos, but they are not outlandishly flashy like the ones seen in Las Vegas. The city still retains it’s late 1800’s charm and we enjoyed the short drive out to see the Governor’s Mansion.

Kit Carson is of course the founder of Carson City.

Kit Carson is of course the founder of Carson City.

The Bliss Mansion is a great example of late 1800s architecture

The Bliss Mansion is a great example of late 1800s architecture

Cactus Jack's Casino kind of shows what the casinos in Carson City are like, lots of neon, but not like the crazy stuff you see in Las Vegas.

Cactus Jack’s Casino kind of shows what the casinos in Carson City are like, lots of neon, but not like the crazy stuff you see in Las Vegas.

42nd St. Downtown retains the feeling of the old west.

42nd St. Downtown retains the feeling of the old west.

The Nevada Fallen Peace Officer's Memorial

The Nevada Fallen Peace Officer’s Memorial

The new Supreme Court Building is just next door to the State Capitol Building.

The new Supreme Court Building is just next door to the State Capitol Building.

The Governor's Mansion is not far away.

The Governor’s Mansion is not far away.

The Nevada State Legislature building is also next door to the State Capitol Building and is where the Nevada Assembly and Senate meet today.

The Nevada State Legislature building is also next door to the State Capitol Building and is where the Nevada Assembly and Senate meet today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a little video of us walking the grounds:

 

 

 

 

The Nevada State Capitol Building is located at 101 N Carson St, Carson City, NV 89701 in downtown Carson City. It is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free.

We are Selling Our Bikes

P1160247 P1160248 P1160249 P1160250 P1160251 P1160252 P1160253 P1160254

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are moving and need to sell our two bicycles. Both bicycles have night lights on them.

The first one is a
White Electra Three Speed Townie Women’s bike. Like the name implies this is a good town bike. It has a gearless 3 speed changing system. It has a mounted basket on the front. It looks fine but it has not been used for over a year so it probably needs a bike tune up.

The second one is a
Black/White/Blue Giant Alux 6000 Series Butted Tubing Road Bike. This bike is made for off road biking. It has shocks in the front. It is 10 speed. I have installed a rack and baskets in the back. It has a flat tire. I have not used it for six months so it probably needs a tune up as well.

I will also include in the price the rack that we put the bikes on. It is a lean-to rack that allows you to stack two bicycles without any nails. You just lean it on the wall and can stack bicycles. Very nice for apartments.

I am selling both bikes as is and you must take both bikes or neither of them. Basically, I just don’t want to move them. The $300 prices is firm, the bikes are both worth way more than $300. I am accepting cash only, no checks, no rainchecks, must be paid all at once, and you must haul them away yourselves. We have no way to deliver them. We move April 23rd, if we don’t sell them by then I will put them in the moving van and then after I am done moving sell them to the scrapper.

If interested call us at 951-823-5883

Why Yes! We are Made of Money! El MIDE, Mexico City

You know your famous when they put you on the money.

You know your famous when they put you on the money.

When you think of Mexico, you might think of poor people. Or, maybe you think of super rich drug cartel owners. Both do exist in Mexico, but the reality is the majority of Mexicans are just a bunch of hard working people just trying to make a living. While Mexico may not be the richest country in the world, it is by no means the poorest either. The fact is that Mexico has a lot of natural resources and when you realize how functional the country is despite sometimes inept government structures, you start to realize how much the country actually has to offer.

The concept of money is a universal concern. The MIDE (Museo Interactivo De Economia, Museum Interactive of Economics) tries to not only explain where money comes from, but where it can take us. The museum lives up to it’s title by being very interactive. Getting caught up in all the different displays it became very apparent how money affects us. It also became very apparent that I did not want to be stuck on a deserted island with AJ because we all “died” when he refused to trade with us.

The museum was located very close to the Bellas Artes Metro station and didn’t cost too much. It was $90 ($5.06 USD) pesos per person or $200 ($11.25 USD) per family of four. For an extra $20 pesos ($1.15 USD) we were able to design our own money, which was a fun little souvenir.

Click to enlarge photos:

In this exhibit they showed you all the anti-fraud mechanisms used in money.

In this exhibit they showed you all the anti-fraud mechanisms used in money.

This exhibit had bags that represented amount of goods.

This exhibit had bags that represented amount of goods.

Mexican pesos are a lot more colorful than US dollars. These frames are made with shredded money.

Mexican pesos are a lot more colorful than US dollars. These frames are made with shredded money.

For some strange reason the torture museum was next to the economics museum.

For some strange reason the torture museum was next to the economics museum.

The MIDE is a very fun place for families to explore.

The MIDE is a very fun place for families to explore.

An old coin mint.

An old coin mint.

On the top floor you started the tour by learning about the enviroment

On the top floor you started the tour by learning about the enviroment

AJ and Denise enjoyed the fact that some of the displays were in English.

AJ and Denise enjoyed the fact that some of the displays were in English.

Mexico's first pesos were printed by the Bank of London.

Mexico’s first pesos were printed by the Bank of London.

Friki Plaza, Mexico City, Mexico

 

It is probably better we don't have a place like this in California or I would spend too much money.

It is probably better we don’t have a place like this in California or I would spend too much money.

When people think of Mexico I think most people in the USA think of either beaches or ancient times such as Pre-Hispanic or Spanish Colonialism. Mexico is that but when it comes to Mexico City people need to understand that it is a major metropolis. As such, there is A LOT of new things in Mexico City. All of that gets incorporated into the cosmo of Mexican Culture.

Point in case is Friki Plaza. Friki Plaza is a four story anime/game/geek store. All four floors, plus the basement of the mall are dedicated to the pursuit of the Otaku culture. On the ground floor you have cell phones, DVDs, and Comic books. The second floor was dedicated to card games such as Pokemon, Magic, and Yugigo. The third floor had all sorts of Otaku snacks such as ramen, soft serve ice cream, okonomiyki, and takoyaki. The fourth floor had every game system you could imagine, which for a small fee you could rent and play. The basement was dedicated to cosplay, things like make up, hats, and wigs.

I liked this pokemon mural, very creative.

I liked this pokemon mural, very creative.

Denise like the Storm Trooper riding a horse.

Denise like the Storm Trooper riding a horse.

AJ and I spent $25 pesos (about $1.50 USD) to play video games for an hour.

AJ and I spent $25 pesos (about $1.50 USD) to play video games for an hour.

One of the many murals, this one was a of a green dragon.

One of the many murals, this one was a of a green dragon.

On the second floor they had benches where players had non-stop card tournaments.

On the second floor they had benches where players had non-stop card tournaments.

For $75 pesos (about $4.20 USD) you rolled two dice and could potentially win a very good card.

For $75 pesos (about $4.20 USD) you rolled two dice and could potentially win a very good card.

A lot of Magic the Gathering cards. Interesting was that they preferred English cards.

A lot of Magic the Gathering cards. Interesting was that they preferred English cards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Describing it sounds very Japanese, but it somehow it wasn’t. It had Japanese stuff but the environment was somehow very Mexican. Once again Mexico took a modern idea and made it into their own.

Pasteleria La Ideal (Ideal Bakery), Mexico City

idealfront
Pasteleria La Ideal is locate at number 18 on Av. 16 de Septiembre Street in downtown Mexico City. About 4 city blocks from the Bellas Artes Metro Station. The bakery was opened in 1927 and was originally called the Ideal Bakery. Opened right in the middle of what is known as the Cristero War (Mexico vs. the Catholic Church) the bakery keeps things pretty simple. It makes a lot of classic bread at really cheap prices. The business model seems to be working because we went on a Thursday morning and they had already sold out of bolillos (mexican rolls), but there was more than an abundance of other bread to find. Also, not to be missed was the cake demonstration room on the 1st floor(as opposed to the ground floor). Some of the cakes there were 10 layers high.

Mexicans love jelly cakes.

Mexicans love jelly cakes.

A selection of filled turnovers.

A selection of filled turnovers.

Grab a tray and some tongs and pick away. Everything on this table was 5 pesos (about .28 cents)

Grab a tray and some tongs and pick away. Everything on this table was 5 pesos (about .28 cents)

The sign says a kilo for 75 pesos (2.2 lbs for about $4.50 USD)

The sign says a kilo for 75 pesos (2.2 lbs for about $4.50 USD)

I put AJ in this frame so you could start to get a feel as to how high these cakes got.

I put AJ in this frame so you could start to get a feel as to how high these cakes got.

La Ideal keeps up to modern day with this Yoda cake. Basically, you give them a picture and they can make a cake out of it.

La Ideal keeps up to modern day with this Yoda cake. Basically, you give them a picture and they can make a cake out of it.

AJ and Denise looking through the bakery.

AJ and Denise looking through the bakery.

San Fernando Cemetery, Mexico City.

ferentranceIf you go to San Fernando Cemetery you will admire many things. You will admire the beautiful arches and impressive gravestones. You will contemplate time and it’s passing in the silence that only a cemetery’s ambiance can let you do. The cemetery is small, but has a lot of twists and turns that will make you wonder if you wonder if you are really in some sort of maze. Then at the end, right before you exit the cemetery gates that lead to the church, you are going to notice one last gravestone. Despite it being simple it will immediately catch your eye due to the last name being so different than all the rest.

The Mexico tombstone of Isadora Duncan

The Mexico tombstone of Isadora Duncan

Isadora Duncan was known for her free flowing intrepetive dance style.

Isadora Duncan was known for her free flowing intrepetive dance style.

Yes, none other the queen of modern dance herself, Isadora Duncan. Or is it? A quick google search will reveal that Angela Isadora Duncan was born in San Francisco in 1877. It will also tell you that she died in Nice, France in 1927. The gravestone set before you is a year off on both ends. What is going on here?

The answer is extreme devotion. Apparently, Mexico in the 20s was obessed with Ms. Duncan. So much that when she died in 1927, the president of Mexico, Plutarco Calles, ordered that a tombstone be erected in the legendary San Fernando Cemetery in her honor. And, apparently also decided to make her a little bit younger than she actually was, hence the change of dates.

This story may seems strange to you, perhaps even a bit of a curiousity (well you at least stuck with the story so far), but upon further inspection it is by no means uncommon for the San Fernando Cemetery. A cemetery where people may or may not be buried.

Coronel Santiago Xicotencatl died defending Mexico from the 1847 invasion of the United States to Mexico.

Coronel Santiago Xicotencatl died defending Mexico from the 1847 invasion of the United States to Mexico.

The not permanent Miguel Miramontes grave.

The not permanent Miguel Miramontes grave.

These two sentries patiently waiting the milinium.

These two sentries patiently waiting the milinium.

The tomb of Benito Juarez

The tomb of Benito Juarez

D. Ysidoro Olvera, died July 28, 1859, the last President of the Congressional Constitution of 1857

D. Ysidoro Olvera, died July 28, 1859, the last President of the Congressional Constitution of 1857

AJ checking out Benito Juarez's tomb.

AJ checking out Benito Juarez’s tomb.

Jose Urbano Fonseca. Chief Supreme Court Judge of Mexico.

Jose Urbano Fonseca. Chief Supreme Court Judge of Mexico.

ferarches ferentrance

The imposing tomb of Ignacio Zaragoza.

The imposing tomb of Ignacio Zaragoza.

The tomb of Ignacio Comonfort

The tomb of Ignacio Comonfort

The empty tomb of Vicente Guerrero

The empty tomb of Vicente Guerrero

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In an impressive masolium on the grounds is a grave dedicated to Mexico’s second president Vicente Guerrero, who fought for the indenpendence of Mexico. As impressive as the grave is, he is not there, the remains were transferred in 1925 to rest under the Independence Monument.

There is the tomb of Ignacio Zaragoza, the famed General who battled the French on the 5th of May in 1862 in Puebla (sorry Cinco de Mayo is not Mexican Indepence Day). He used to be burried in San Fernando, but he too was exhumed and reburried in a monument in Puebla.

Then there Santiago F. Xicotencatl, who is famous for dying in 1847 because rather than surrendering the Mexican flag to invading U.S. forces he wrapped himself in the flag and jumped off Chapultepec Castle (which back then was a military college) into a hail of bullets. He too was exhumed and reburied in a monument at the base of Chapultepec Park.

Exhumation and reburriel seems to be a common theme at San Fernando Cemetery. The names go on and on. Ignacio Comonfort, 25th President of Mexico used to be burried in the cemetery, Provisional President, Miguel Miramon was ordered executed fired (literally fired) by President Benito Juarez, had a temporary grave at San Fernando.

All these people buried, exhumed, and then reburried. It really made me rethink the idea of “final resting place.” Despite the many empty graves there are however some people still burried at San Fernando Cemetery. Ysidoro Olvera, the last Congressional President of the 1857 Constitution, who was imprisioned by Ignacio Comonfort got to stay. There are many generals of the different Mexican wars that are still there.

The most famous resident in San Fernando, who also consequentially has the biggest tomb in San Fernando is that of Benito Juarez. Benito Juarez was the 26th President of Mexico. Having died in 1872 of a heart attack while reading a newspaper in the National Palace. The sculpture in his tomb is made of marble and depicts a “Mother Mexico” weaping over the fallen Benito Juarez.

fermonarchbarsIndeed San Fernando Cemetery is a strange place to be, but definitely place worth a visit. Perhaps it doesn’t do it’s job as final resting place, but it does a great job in helping the visitor remember those that have passed on. It is pretty easy to get to, all you have to do is go to the Blue/Grean Hidalgo station and walk a few blocks. Admission is free and it is open as long as there is light outside.

“America Tropical” Uncovering Siqueiros in California

On Saturday our Ward (church group) was going to Olivera St. for the day. Denise and I have been to Olivera St. at least a dozen of times. It happens to be my second favorite place in the world to get a churro and with my hispanic roots it is a good place for me to rekindle some of those roots without having to make a drive to the border .That said we kind of feel like we know the place, but as we discovered yesterday we really don’t.

Our walking tour guide Frank Lin.

Our walking tour guide Frank Lin.

While we were at Olivera St. we decided to take a walking tour and during the tour we visited two places that we had never seen before. One of those was the America Tropical Interpretative Center.

 

 

 

siqamericatropical

Siqueros was definitely a rebel rouser wherever he roamed.

The story of America Tropical starts with the famous artist David Alfaro Siqueiros. To understand the painting you need to know a little bit about Siqueiros’ history. Siqueros history starts as a muralist for the Mexican Revolutionist government in the 20’s under Alvaro Obregon. A firebrand painter, Siqueiros painted murals depicting the Mexican worker fighting for their rights. It was no surprise that he eventually joined the Mexican Communist Party. For this he was jailed in the 30’s and exiled from Mexico.

He eventually ended up in Los Angeles, California in 1932. Which just happened to be the year of the Olympics. At that time Olivera St. had fallen on hard times. A movement was going to restore Olivera St. as a historical district. Some business owner got the idea to paint this mural by this famous painter. The idea was to paint a lush tropical garden scene with birds and plants. With all the people coming for the Olympics it would work out great.

The first vision of America Tropical was a bit harsh for America.

The first vision of America Tropical was a bit harsh for America.

What they got was America Tropical (“La América Tropical”). A harsh depiction of an Imperialist eagle overseeing the destruction of the Americas. To the right were Peruvian and Mexican revolutionaries trying to shoot the eagle down in vain. The business owners were shocked. Almost immediately the part with the revolutionaries was white washed. In 1938 many Mexicans were forcefully deported under the Mexican Repatriation Act of 1938, Siqueiros was one of the first to go. Siqueiros would go back to Mexico and continue painting famous murals in the Pallace of the Fine Arts (Palacio de las Bellas Artes) and the National University of Mexico (UNAM). As soon as his was deported Olivera St. white washed the rest of the mural.

The mural was then forgotten for many years until in the 1960’s some paint started to chip from the walls and someone rediscovered the mural. The answer apparently was to cover it up with more paint (they were not as radical in the 60’s as we thought). In 1982 records show that the mural was again rediscovered, but they decided to cover it up with plywood. Again forgotten.

What the mural looks like today. You can barely make out the colors.

What the mural looks like today. You can barely make out the colors. (click to enlarge)

This is a photoshop version of how I imagine the colors might have looked

This is a photoshop version of how I imagine the colors might have looked (click to enlarge).

And there it sat under paint and plywood until in 2012 The Getty Conservation group made a million dollar (actually 1.2 million dollars) offer Olivera St. could not refuse. After some very hard patient work, a mural forgotten for over 80 years is now uncovered once again. The colors are a bit faded but the mural can be seen.Which to me is funny because I have been to Olivera St. numerous times since 2012 and I never heard of the painting or it’s story until I took a free walking tour (thank you Las Angelitas del Pueblo).

Not only did the the Getty restore the mural, but they helped restore the Sepulveda house.

Not only did the the Getty restore the mural, but they helped restore the Sepulveda house.

The interpretive center is a wonderful resource to understanding the mural. In addition to being a viewing area for the mural, you can learn about Siqueros and how the mural was restored. The best part about it is it is all FREE! Just walk in and learn for yourself. And when your done with that, you can visit the Sepulveda House (another place I learned about), which deserves it’s own post later.

 

AJ Meets the Stars, Universal Studios, California

AJ thought it was cool to take a picture with a movie star, but he wanted to know why she was famous.

AJ thought it was cool to take a picture with a movie star, but he wanted to know why she was famous.

Last week AJ and I took the Metrolink (commuter link train) into LA and took advantage of our season passes to Universal Studios. For just two people the Metrolink is far more convienant than driving. It only costs $10 and includes all transfers for the day. I figure for $20 I couldn’t beat the gas, plus parking, plus wear on the car, and most important frustration with LA traffic.

AJ enjoyed seeing all the animals.

AJ enjoyed seeing all the animals.

We really didn’t have an agenda when we got there. The weather was a bit cold and overcast, but that was good because there wasn’t hardly any crowds. Not only did we see all the shows and attractions (except for Crusty Fun Land because we don’t really like the Simpsons that much), but we went on several of the attractions twice. AJ decided that his favorite show was the animal actor show.

Since there wasn’t a lot of lines and we were just wandering the park, we got to see a lot of the actors roaming the park as well. We didn’t ask for any autographs, but we enjoyed taking pictures.

AJ with a NEST (Transformers) operative.

AJ with a NEST (Transformers) operative.

AJ and I with Gru and a minion. I was dressed for the occasion, I don't know why AJ didn't read the memo.

AJ and I with Gru and a minion. I was dressed for the occasion, I don’t know why AJ didn’t read the memo.

AJ with the Bishop from Water World.

AJ with the Bishop from Water World.

The Wizarding World of Harry Potter is still closed. We checked.

The Wizarding World of Harry Potter is still closed. We checked.

AJ hanging out with the dog that played in Evan Almighty.

AJ hanging out with the dog that played in Evan Almighty.

After we left the park we went to Olivera St. to have some authentic Mexican food.

After we left the park we went to Olivera St. to have some authentic Mexican food.

AJ’s Baptism

baptismfontAJ turned 8 last month which for him was significant in many ways. First, he is another year older. Second, and most important for us is he is old enough to get baptized. In the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints it is very clear that is a parents job to teach their children about “repentance, faith in Christ the Son of the living God, and of baptism and the gift of the Holy Ghost”. It seems simple enough (I am a returned missionary), but as convert I wasn’t sure how to teach AJ about being a member all his life when I am not. Lucky for me Denise has been a member all her life. We have been teaching AJ since the day that he was born the importance of baptism. We have taken him to any and all baptisms we could go to. As such it was not much of a shocker to me that he was more than willing to do his Bishopric interview all by himself.

The baptism itself went great. It was standing room only as all of Denise’s family was at the baptism, plus many from our ward. Denise’s dad gave a very heart warming testimony.

After the baptism, we had a get together at the park with a very nice cake made by a sister in our ward. After the park we went bowling. Then to finish the day we went to the Soup Plantation in San Bernardino.

All in all it was a great day. All I can say to anyone who helped make this day in anyway possible, THANK YOU!! I recognize the fact that AJ has been helped along the way by many people. There is no great joy to a parent than to see their child follow in the way of the Savior, so that someday they can return to their Heavenly Father.

This was only some of the people who came to the baptism.

This was only some of the people who came to the baptism.

After the park we went to Arlington Lanes. I did horrible.

After the park we went to Arlington Lanes. I did horrible.

Sister Long made us this great cake, we won it at a Scout Camp auction.

Sister Long made us this great cake, we won it at a Scout Camp auction.

After the Baptism we all met at Bonamino park to get out the wiggles.

After the Baptism we all met at Bonamino park to get out the wiggles.

You would think with a challenge like that they should at least offer you a T-Shirt.

You would think with a challenge like that they should at least offer you a T-Shirt.

2016 Tournament of Roses (Float) Viewing Area

rosefindadventureFind Your Adventure was the theme of the 2016 Tournament of Roses Parade. I thought this was a great theme for me this year to think about. We did not renew our Knotts Berry Farm passes this year (after 39 times we were kind of burnt out), so it will be up to find our own adventures this year.

To start the adventure off, Denise’s family was in town so we went to the viewing are of the Rose Bowl floats. It cost $10 for viewing area and $3 for the shuttle per person.

Before going to the see the floats we had hot dogs at the Dog Haus, one of my favorite hot dog places in Southern California. The novelty is that they use Hawaiian rolls for the bun.

The viewing area was very full with people but we enjoyed seeing all the floats up close.

Before viewing the floats we went to Dog Haus on Hill Avenue for lunch.

Before viewing the floats we went to Dog Haus on Hill Avenue for lunch.

I think this float best fits our family

I think this float best fits our family

Overall, the floats are interesting but up close the intricacy is amazing as well.

Overall, the floats are interesting but up close the intricacy is amazing as well.

The Sunny Side of Life float by Los Angeles was interesting to me.

The Sunny Side of Life float by Los Angeles was interesting to me.

There were two miles of floats and crowds at the viewing area.

There were two miles of floats and crowds at the viewing area.

We were told Stanford won their game.

We were told Stanford won their game.

Talking to the float technicians was interesting. They had some of the floats going.

Talking to the float technicians was interesting. They had some of the floats going.

For the VIPs they used old Yosemite touring vehicles.

For the VIPs they used old Yosemite touring vehicles.

This flying clown float was huge.

This flying clown float was huge.

I loved the colors on this dragon float.

I loved the colors on this dragon float.

When faced with the millennium falcon a faux light saber battle is a must.

When faced with the millennium falcon a faux light saber battle is a must.

The Disneyland float was very long.

The Disneyland float was very long.

We used the shuttle service from the Pasadena City College.

We used the shuttle service from the Pasadena City College.oa