Amatuer Chocolatier

After watching some videos on YouTube about Belize and it’s rich chocolate history I stumbled upon a video on how to make chocolate bars and decided I could do that myself. I would link the video but I can’t find it, but I will say it wasn’t hard. The hardest part was finding Cocoa Butter (which I learned is not the same thing as Coconut Oil). I have been experimenting with different variations and so far this has been what has been working for me:

50 Grams Cocoa Butter
60 Grams Cocoa Powder
4 Tablespoons Honey

First you need to make a double boiler. I did this by combining a metal bowl and a sauce pan together. The water can’t touch the bowl.
Then you need to slowly heat up cocoa butter. It is kind of tricky because you need to get it hot but not too hot. There is a whole process of tempering but I am not going to put that here. You can google it, or just eat your chocolate un-tempered.
After the butter is melted, you can add in the honey.
After the mix is well mixed together you add the cocoa powder.
To make milk chocolate add in crushed dry milk powder when you add the cocoa powder.

The key to the this is using only plastic or metal instruments and what ever you do, no water can get into the mix.

My favorite was almond and toasted rice. The peanut butter ones were good as well.

My favorite was almond and toasted rice. The peanut butter ones were good as well.

 

For molds I used the lids from plastic sandwich containers and ice cube trays. I liked the ice cube trays the best. It takes about 2 hrs. for the chocolate to properly harden.

The Last Day of Summer


Today was the last day of Summer for AJ. Come Monday it is back to school. Most kids dread it, I know I did, but I guess school is more fun than when I was a kid, because AJ is excited to go back. On Friday Denise went to AJ’s school and found out who his new teacher was going to be. Denise told me (John) who it was going to be but I already forgot, good thing I am not starting school on Monday!

 

From our spot on the beach we had a great view of the pier.

From our spot on the beach we had a great view of the pier.

Since Denise was gone on Saturday it was just AJ and me for his last free day of Summer. We are planning for a big trip soon so I didn’t have a lot of money, but I found a twenty in my wallet. You’d think that twenty dollars wouldn’t get you far, but thanks to Metrolink it got us plenty far. Two all day weekend passes for $20 USD were all we needed to get us to the beach.

What could be better than to spend the last day of Summer at the San Clemente Pier. The train literally leaves you at the beach. You get off the tunnel, cross under the bridge and there you are. The beach was busy but not crowded. We had fun playing in the sand, built the biggest sand castle of the day (with no shovel or pail, just seaweed and rocks), and kicked the soccer ball a bit. Traffic was bad on the 91 coming back, but we were on the train so we just zipped right by it. Definitely will be doing that again.

AJ got excited as we traveled down the coast to the San Clemente Pier station.

AJ got excited as we traveled down the coast to the San Clemente Pier station.

The San Clemente Pier station is so close you just get off, cross the tracks under the tunnel, and you are on the beach.

The San Clemente Pier station is so close you just get off, cross the tracks under the tunnel, and you are on the beach.

This is what you get when you give AJ a camera.

This is what you get when you give AJ a camera.

 

AJ conquers the waves.

AJ conquers the waves.

We made the biggest sandcastle we could see on the beach and we didn't even have a shovel or a pail.

We made the biggest sandcastle we could see on the beach and we didn’t even have a shovel or a pail.

AJ escapes from the Riverside-La Sierra Station.

AJ escapes from the Riverside-La Sierra Station.

I was really happy not to be driving the 91 on the way back.

I was really happy not to be driving the 91 on the way back.

Hiking to Dante’s Peak and Visiting the Griffith Park Observatory

The bridge up the Dante's Peak trail.

The bridge up the Dante’s Peak trail.

Last Saturday Denise’s family decided to get together and have a picnic. Deciding we wanted to do a little bit more than a picnic we decided to go and do a little hike together. The original plan was to go all the way to the top of the Hollywood sign, but after research showed that it was going to be 6 miles round trip we opted for a shorter 3.5 mile trip up to Dante’s Peak.

The hike up to Dante’s Peak wasn’t too bad. We got there at 9 AMwhich was good for two reasons. One, it wasn’t too hot and two, there was still parking at the observatory. I think if we had gotten there 5 mins. later we would have been out of luck. The trail up to Dante’s peak is well defined and offers beautiful views over Los Angeles and all the way to the ocean. Just before Dante’s Peak is Dante’s View. At Dante’s view there are some benches and a water fountain.

Uncle Bob carries Madison up at Dante's View.

Uncle Bob carries Madison up at Dante’s View.

The family on the way up to Dante's Peak.

The family on the way up to Dante’s Peak.

John, Madison, and AJ taking a break to look at the Hollywood sign.

John, Madison, and AJ taking a break to look at the Hollywood sign.

From the Dante's Peak trail you can see all the way to the ocean.

From the Dante’s Peak trail you can see all the way to the ocean.

The Wrights, Aunt Judy, and AJ looking at the "Hollywoo" sign (when you get up there you will get it).

The Wrights, Aunt Judy, and AJ looking at the “Hollywoo” sign (when you get up there you will get it).

Berlin Forrest picnic area offers some great views of LA.

Berlin Forrest picnic area offers some great views of LA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AJ saw these guys exercising on top of Dante's peak.

AJ saw these guys exercising on top of Dante’s peak.

Once AJ saw people exercising up on Dante's Peak he had to do it as well.

Once AJ saw people exercising up on Dante’s Peak he had to do it as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After going taking in the views at Dante’s peak we went had a little picnic back at the trailhead in a little campsite called the Berlin Forrest (LA and Berlin apparently are sister cities). We also went to go and see the Griffith Park Observatory. The planetarium shows cost about $7 dollars, but everything else is free. AJ was really enthusiastic about the lecture on how to build a comet. I on the other hand enjoyed a nap in an air conditioned room.

We saw a Tesla Coil. Which was interesting but I didn't get it's usefulness other than it sparked.

We saw a Tesla Coil. Which was interesting but I didn’t get it’s usefulness other than it sparked.

The telescope inside the dome was big.

The telescope inside the dome was big.

This solar telescope focuses in light and provides really detailed pictures of the mountain range.

This solar telescope focuses in light and provides really detailed pictures of the mountain range.

A view from the roof of the observatory.

A view from the roof of the observatory.

This was the first US rocket to make orbit. It is full scale. As you can see, it wasn't very big.

This was the first US rocket to make orbit. It is full scale. As you can see, it wasn’t very big.

This is a view of the planets exhibit from the view of Pluto (which is still considered a planet in New Mexico).

This is a view of the planets exhibit from the view of Pluto (which is still considered a planet in New Mexico).

The Griffith Park Observatory is a great place to learn new things.

The Griffith Park Observatory is a great place to learn new things.

The murals from the 1930s show in pictograph man's progress in science.

The murals from the 1930s show in pictograph man’s progress in science.

A moon rock.

A moon rock.

hollycometmaking

AJ enjoyed the lecture, John enjoyed a nap.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When we finally left Griffith park at about 2:00 PM. The place was packed! There was no parking at the observatory and the park rangers were diverting all cars off the road to the observatory. For us it was a great time, we were going the opposite way of traffic by that time and except for some minor stop and go on the freeway got home great.

We got a quick view of the Centennial Aqueduct up on the way to the observatory.

We got a quick view of the Centennial Aqueduct up on the way to the observatory.

150 Generations Later…

I think I am going to need more paper...

I think I am going to need more paper…

One of the suggested activities they always say in church is to do your Genealogy. So today I went on FamilySearch.org and showed my mom some research tools.
One of the games I like to play on FamilySearch.org is what I call “How far can you click?” The way the games goes is you start going through family lines and see how far you go until you run into a dead link (no more names). Today I went through a line I call the Thornton line, this turned out to be a really long game today.

 

The coolest thing is now I can say we are all related. So when do I get to come over for dinner?
Thornton Adam Line:
1) Adam
Eve (4000BC-3074 BC)
2) Seth, son of Adam (3979BC-3067BC)
Azura bat Adam (3979BC-3067BC)
3) Enos, son of Seth (3765BC-2860BC)
Noam Bit Seth Of Elda
4) Cainan, son of Enos
Mualeleth
5) Mahalaheel, son of Cainan
Sina (Dinah) Bint Barakiel Of East Eden (3605 BC)
6) Jared, son of Mahalaheel
(NA)
7) Enoch, son of Jared (3378BC-3013BC)
Ednl Bint Daniel
8) Methusalah, son of Enoch (3317BC-2348BC)
(NA)
9) Noah, son of Lamech (2948BC-1998BC)
Emzara Daughter of Lemach
10) Shem, son of Noah
Emzara (Naamah)
11) Arphaxad, son of Shem
(NA)
12) Salah, son of Arphaxed (2306BC-1873BC)
(NA)
13) Eber, son of Salah
(NA)
14) Peleg, son of Eber
(NA)
15) Reu, son of Peleg (2212BC-1973BC)
(NA)
16) Serug,son of Reu (2180BC-1950BC)
(NA)
17) Nahor I ben Serug (2150BC-2002BC)
Jaska (‘Ijaska) (2152BC)
18) Terah, son of Nahor (2121BC-1916BC)
Emtelal (Amethelo) of Agade (2154BC)
19) Abraham, son of Terah
Sarah (Saral) (2012BC-1885BC)
20) Isaac, son of Abraham
Rebecca
21) Jacob (Israel) ben Isaac (1886BC-1739BC)
Leah
22) Judah ben Jacob King of Gosher
Tamer
23) Zarah
(NA)
24) Dardanus (1460-1414BC)
(NA)
25) Erichthonius the Dardanian King of Arcadia (1420BC-1368BC)
Astyoche Ilium (1397BC-1328BC)
26) Tros Acadia Dardania Troy (1314BC-1281BC)
Callirhot Callirhoe IIium (1354BC-1279BC)
27) Iulus Ascanlus Alba Longa Troy (1350BC-1279BC)
Eurydice Troy (1100BC-1281BC)
28) Laomedon Loomedante Troy (1279BC-1235BC)
Placia Strymo of Troy (1290BC-1185BC)
29) Prlam King of Troy (1235BC-1185BC)
Hecuba Phrygia (1235BC-1183BC)
30) King Helenus of Troy (1070BC-1149BC)
Andromache
31) Genger King of Cimmerian Bosporus
(NA)
32) Esdron
(NA)
33) Esdron
(NA)
34) Gelio King of Troy (1150BC-1010BC)
Gelio (Zelius) 1105BC
35) Basabiliano King of Troy (1125BC-1025BC)
Basabiliano (Basabellian) I (1975BC)
36) Plaserius I I King Of Plaserio King of Troy (2000BC-1000BC)
Plaserio (Plaserius) I (1045BC)
37) Plesron I I King Of Plesron King of Troy (1075BC-975BC)
(NA)
38) Eliacor I Of Cimmerians Eliacor King of Troy (1050BC-950BC)
(NA)
39) Zaberian Of Cimmerians Gaberiano, King of Troy (1025BC-925BC)
Gaberiano (Zaberian) (1055BC)
40) Plaserius II Plaserio King of Troy (1000BC-900BC)
(NA)
41) Antenor I Antenor King of Troy (975BC-875BC)
(NA)
42) Priamos II Van Commeria, King of Troy (900BC)
(NA)
43) Helenus II, King of Troy (920BC-750BC)
Helenus II of Troy (935BC)
44) Plesron II (King of Troy) (910BC-820BC)
Plasron (905BC)
45) King Basabelian II (875BC-790BC)
Basabiliano II (875BC)
46) King Alexandros of Troy (827BC-677BC)
Alexandre Troy (845BC)
47) King Priamos III Van Commeria of Troy (800BC-655BC)
Priam III (815 BC)
48) King Gentilanor V Van Commeria (785BC-625BC)
Gentilanor (785BC)
49) Almadius I Van Commeria, (King of the Cimmerians) (750BC-650BC)
Wife, of Almadius I Van Commeria, (King of the Cimmerians) (755BC)
50) Dilulius I Van Commeria, (King of the Cimmerians) (725BC-625BC)
Dilulius (725BC)
51) Helenus III Van Commeria (King of the Cimmerians) (700BC-600BC)
(NA)
52) Plaserius III Van Commeria King of the Cimmerians
(NA)
53) Dilulius II Van Commeria, King of the Cimmerians
(NA)
54) Marcomir I Van Commeria, King of the Cimmerians
(NA)
55) Priamos IV, (King of the Cimmerians) (600BC-500BC)
(NA)
56) Helenus IV Van Commeria, (King of the Cimmerians) (575BC-475BC)
(NA)
57) Antenor II, Prince of the Cimmerians (540BC-443BC)
(NA)
58) King Marcomir I, of the Sicambri (520BC-412BC)
(NA)
59) King Antenor I of the Cimmerians = Cambra (500BC-412BC)
Cambra (500BC-400BC)
60) King Priamos V of the Sicambrii (475BC-358BC)
(NA)
61) King Helenus V, of the Sicambrii (439BC-339BC)
(NA)
62) King Diocles, of the Sicambrii (425BC-325BC)
(NA)
63) King Bassanus Magnus of the Sicambri (400BC-300BC)
(NA)
64) Clodomir I King of the Sicambri (375BC-275BC)
Clodomir I (375BC-275BC)
65) King Nicanor of the Sicambrii (350BC-250BC)
Constancia of Britain (350BC-250BC)
66) King Marcomir II of the Sicambrii (325BC-225BC)
Marcomir II of the Sicambrii (225BC)
67) Clodius I (159BC)
Clodius I (200BC)
68) Antenor III (143BC)
Antenor III (270BC-170BC)
69) Clodimir II (123BC)
Clodimir II (250BC-150BC)
70) Merodacus (125BC)
Mercadacus (225BC-125BC)
71) Cassander (100BC)
Cassander (200BC-100BC)
72) Anturius (75BC
Anturis (175BC-75BC)
73) Francus (150BC-50BC)
(NA)
74) Clodimir II (125BC-25BC)
(NA)
75) Marcomir III (97BC-50BC)
(NA)
76) Clodimir III (70BC)
(NA)
77) Antenor IV King of the West Franks (70BC)
(NA)
78) Ratherius King of Franks
(NA)
79) Richemer I King of Franks
(NA)
80) Odomir IV de la Franks (50-150)
(NA)
81) Marcomir I King of the Franks (75-175)
Athildis, Princess of Britain (241)
82) Clodomir rol des France (100-200)
(NA)
83) Farabert King of Franks (122-186)
Hafilda Princess of Rugij (106-179)
84) Sunno (Huano Hunno) King of Franks (165-213)
(NA)
85) Rey Hilderic (253)
(NA)
86) Rey de los Francos Bartherus (Batherus) (238-272)
(NA)
87) Rey Clodius III (298)
(NA)
88) Rey de los Francos Walter (306)
(NA)
89) Duque de los Francos Dragobert II (317)
(NA)
90) Duque Genebald I (262-350)
(NA)
91) Duque Dagobert II (300-379)
(NA)
92) Duque de los Francos Clodius I (324-389)
Duchess of East Franks
93) Marcomir I, (Duke of East Franks) (347-404)
Marcomir (Duchess of the East Franks) (354-450)
94) Pharmond (First King of France) (370-427)
Argotta Queen of the Salic Franks (376-438)
95) Clodius Clodion the Long Haired King of the Salis Franks (395-447)
Basina (Princess of the Thuringians) (398-470)
96) Merovech, King of the Franks (415-457)
Verica Princess of Sweden Queen of France (419)
97) Siegbert “The Lame” Meroving King of Cologne (436-509)
Basina of Thuringia (452-470)
98) Chloderic (Clovis I ) “The Parricide” Meroving (The Great King of Franks) (465-511)
Evochilde NN
99) King Childebert Paris (496-558)
Queen Vultrogothe of Paris (500-558)
100) Siegbert The Lame, King of Cologne (509)
Theodelinde Bourgogne Queen of Burgandy (452)
101) Cloderic (The Parricide) King of Cologne (480-509)
Saint Clothilde (477)
102) Munderic Prince of Cologne of Vitrey-en-Perthois (505-534)
Arthemia de Lyons (490-550)
103) Bodegisel I of Aquitaine (524-607)
Oda Itte (567-636)
104) Arnulfo de Metz (582-641)
Dode Ode Doda Clothilde de Metz of Saxony (586-640)
105) Ansegisel (615-679)
Saint Begga de Landen (613-698)
106) Pepin II of Herstal (635-714)
Adpaide (Concubine of Austrasia) (654-705)
107) King Charles Martel (689-741)
Rotrude (695-724)
108) Mayor of the Palace Carloman de Paris (712-755)
Chrotrude Franks Princess Of (713)
109) Gerard De Rousillion (723-816)
Baroness Withburgis of Paris (736)
110) Hugh II of Tours Count (765-836)
Bava of Upper Alsace (769-837)*
111) Hugh Bourges Count Of (802-853)
Bava (805)
112) Tertulle or Tortulf or Tertuilus (821-921)
Pertonilla, Countess of Anjou (825)
113) Ingelger I Count Anjou (870-888)
Adele DE Gatinais
114) Fulk I “The Red” of Anjou Count of Anjou (870-938)
Rocilla De Louches (1009)
115) William III ” (Guillaume) “le Libérateur” de Provence comte d’Arles & Provence (950-993)
Adelaide Adela Blanca Blanche D’ Anjou (938-1026)*
116) Robert II The Pious King of France (972-1031)
Constance Taillefer de Toulouse Queen of France (986-1032)*
117) Baudouin V Count of Flanders (1012-1067)
Adelaide Havoise (1009-1079)*
118) King William I the Conqueror “The Bastard” Duke of Normandy Of England (1024-1087)
Matilda of Flanders (1059-1117)*
119) King Henry I “Beauclerc” “The Good Scholar” of England (1068-1135)
(NA)
120) Earl Robert “The Consul” Of Gloucester of Caen (1086-1147)
Duchess Mabel FitzRobert Of Gloucester Fitzhamon (1090-1157)
121) Earl Ranulph of Chester Le Meschines (1106-1189)
Countess Matilda Maud of Chester Fitzobert (1106-1189)*
122) 6th Earl Hugh Of Chester De Keveliock (1147-1181)
Betrade De Montford (1155-1227)
123) 4th Earl of Derby William De Ferrers (1162-1247)
Lady Chartley Agnes De Keveliock (1170-1247)*
124) (Lord) William Vesci (1205-1253)
Agatha DeFerrers (1229-1290)*
125) Roger Buckton (1207)
Agnes De Vesci (1211)*
126) Gilbert (Forrester) Buckton (1265)
Drusil Forester De Buckton (1241)
127) Gilbert Forster (1290-1342)
Ivetta Vaux (1292)
128) John Forster (1316-1371)
(NA)
129) Robert Forster (1355)
(NA)
130) Thomas Forster (1395-1430)
Joan Elmeden (1421)
131) SIR KNIGHT Thomas FORSTER 9th Governor of Bamborough, Knight, Marshal of Berwick-upon-Tweed (1451-1526)
Elizabeth De Etherstone (1428-1450)
132) Sir Walter Forrester (1459-1550)
Agnes Graham (1462-1550)
133) Robert Bruce of Airth (1495)
Janet Forrester (1494-1600)*
134) Sir Alexander Bruce of Airth (1530-1600)
Janet Livingston- (1535-1599)
135) Sir Alexander Menteith (1513-1580)
Marion Bruce (1560-1650)*
136) Sir William Menteith (1575-1619)
Jeane Bruce (1582-1640)
137) James Menteith (1600-1650)
Margaret Callendar (1595)
138) Christopher David Sterling (1612-1683)
Margaret Menteith (1618-1680)*
139) John Sterling (1638-1701)
Alice Bassett (1640-1750)
140) John Stirling (1676-1741)
Mary Martin
141) James Clack (1655-1723)
Mary Sterling Bolling (1699-1763)*
142) William Thornton (1717-1790)
Jane Clack (1721-1729)*
143) Sterling Thorton
(NA)
144) William Thornton (1780-1826)
Elizabeth Christian (1779-1816)
145) Prime Coleman (1803-1844)
Sarah Thorton (1807-1892)*
146) John Svendsen Jacobs (1825-1919)
Elizabeth Coleman (1835-1926)*
147) Andrew Jacobs (1872-1961)
Elizabeth Hannah Clough (1879-1966)
148) Andrew Ford Jacobs (1910-1987)
Frieda Irene Ard (1917-2011)
149) Arnoldo Pedroza Escalera (1944-Living)
Janet Kay Jacobs (1945-Living)*
150) John Pedroza (1976-Living)
Denise Pedroza (1976-Living)
151) Arnold John Pedroza (2007-Living)

*Means I went up through a matriarchal line
(NA)=Not Available

Wilson Stone House: City of Riverside Landmark #75

Location: 3241 Mary St.
Date Established: 1929
Date Visited: 6/27/2014

wilsonsideThe plaque at the Wilson house states the following:
“Charles D. Wilson, a.k.a. Wellson, constructed this distinctive stone house in 1929 in a style that blends the more sophisticated Arts and Crafts ideal of using natural materials for enhancement with the regional tradition of using locally available river rock for construction. Mr. Wilson and his wife Nannie J. Wilson and his father C. Leland Wilson, for whom the adjacent side street is named, made it their home.”

The Arts and Crafts style is definitely noted in this bungalow style house in that it has that the signature porch, emphasis on woodwork, and exposed rafters that you see in many Arts and Crafts homes. The house also mixes in Tudor elements in the crown rockwork on the chimney, a distinctive archway at the top of the porch, and a steep gable roof.

wilsonplaque wilsonfront wilsonwalkway

The Roosevelt Palm: City of Riverside Landmark #64

Location: The corner of Victoria Avenue and Myrtle Avenue.
Date Established: 5/7/1903
Date Visited: 6/28/2014

President Roosevelt planting one of the Tibbets trees on May 8, 1903 at the Mission Inn.

President Roosevelt planting one of the Tibbets trees on May 8, 1903 at the Mission Inn.

A old post card showing the Roosevelt Palm Tree.

A old post card showing the Roosevelt Palm Tree.

One of the most celebrated pictures in Riverside is that of then President Theodore Roosevelt planting the original Navel orange trees at the Mission Inn on May 8, 1903.Unfortunately, that tree died in 1922 as a result of a bad fungus infection. The last known bit of that tree is currently in South Africa, a gift from Dr. Archibald Shamel to Sir Percy Fitzpatrick. A sad story but luckily the other orange tree at Magnolia and Arlington is still alive.

What very few people talk about in Riverside is that there is another tree in Riverside planted by President Roosevelt that is still alive. The centennial tree is a Mexican Fan Palm located on the corner of Victoria Avenue and Myrtle Avenue. The date was May 7, 1903 and the President was right in the middle of an ambitious campaign tour of the 25 western states.

A train full of oranges on standby waiting for the presidential train in Highgrove in 1903.

A train full of oranges on standby waiting for the presidential train in Highgrove in 1903.

A picture of President Roosevelt's 1903 campaign train.

A picture of President Roosevelt’s 1903 campaign train.

Prior to arriving in Riverside President Roosevelt had already made speeches in Barstow, Victorville, and Redlands. Despite the very long day the President stopped his special campaign train at the Pechappa siding near Arlington Avenue, which was several miles away from downtown. By invitation of Cornelius Rumsey President Roosevelt went on a tour along Victoria Avenue, which at the time was the main corridor for the city of Riverside.

The Roosevelt Palm Plaque when it was first set up on 1965. (Note: The 5/8/03 date on the plaque is wrong)

The Roosevelt Palm Plaque when it was first set up on 1965. (Note: The 5/8/03 date on the plaque is wrong)

The Roosevelt Palm plaque as it stands today (6/28/14).

The Roosevelt Palm plaque as it stands today (6/28/14).

It was on this scenic ride a memorial was laid by Mr. Rumsey that said the following:
“In remembrance of the constant friendship of Queen Victoria for the American Republic this memorial palm was started by Theodore Roosevelt, President of the United States of America. May 7, 1903, the gift of a son of the American Revolution of the sixth generation of American ancestry.”**

A view up of the Roosevelt Palm. Looking at the bark it looks like it may have sustained fire damage.

A view up of the Roosevelt Palm. Looking at the bark it looks like it may have sustained fire damage.

A view of the corner of Victoria Avenue and Myrtle Avenue. The Roosevelt Palm is the one on the far right.

A view of the corner of Victoria Avenue and Myrtle Avenue. The Roosevelt Palm is the one on the far right.

 

After the very brief stop the procession continued on Victoria, across the Victoria Bridge (which was still made out of wood), and on to Glenwood (Mission Inn) Hotel at which he arrived very late. While there he gave some brief remarks:
“AT RIVERSIDE, CAL., MAY 7, 1903.
Mr. Mayor, and you, my fellow citizens:

I have enjoyed to the full getting into your beautiful State. I had read about what I should expect here in Southern California, but I had formed no idea of the fertility of your soil, the beauty of your scenery, or the wonderful manner in which the full advantage of that soil had been taken by man. Here I am in the pioneer community of irrigated fruit growing in California. In many other parts of the country I have had to preach irrigation. Here you practice it, and all I have to say here is that I earnestly wish that I could have many another community learn from you how you have handled your business. Not only has it been most useful, but it is astonishing to see how with the use you have combined beauty. You have made of this city and its surroundings a veritable little paradise.

It has been delightful to see you. Today has been my first day in California. I need hardly say that I have enjoyed it to the full. I am glad to be welcomed by all of you, but most of all by the men of the Grand Army, and after them by my own comrades of the National Guard, and I have been particularly pleased to pass between the rows of school children. I like your stock and I am glad it is not dying out.

I shall not try this evening to do more than say to you a word of thanks for your greeting to me. I admire your country, but I admire most of all the men and women of the country. It is a good thing to grow citrus fruits, but it is even a better thing to have the right kind of citizenship. I think you have been able to combine the very extraordinary material prosperity with that form of the higher life which must be built upon material prosperity if it is to amount to what it should in the long run.

I am glad to have seen you. I thank you for coming here to greet me. I wish you well at all times and in every way, and I bid you good luck and good night.”*

Keeping up the pace he planted the Tibbets tree at the Mission Inn early the next morning and went on to make additional speeches in Claremont, Pasadena, and Los Angeles on the same day.

The tree today (6/28/14) still stands, but not alone as it is accompanied by a few other palm trees on a little island at the side of the road. Originally the tree was called the Victoria Palm because many people living on Victoria Avenue were from England, but over time it was renamed the Roosevelt Palm after Theodore Roosevelt who planted the tree. The palm tree is very tall, but not the tallest of the group at the location. The bark kind of has a black coloration to it, which is odd for a palm tree. It kind of looked to me that the tree has survived fire or disease (maybe both).

A dedicatory plaque at the Helen Hays Yeagar Memorial Grove.

A dedicatory plaque at the Helen Hays Yeagar Memorial Grove.

Also at the side of the road is a little memorial garden called the Helen Hays Yeager Memorial Grove, which was built by the Victoria Avenue Forever Organization. Helen Hays Yeager was a Riverside local for 50 years and was known for taking care of the orange trees at that corner. After her death her husband dedicated the grove to the city of Riverside as garden and the Victoria Avenue Forever organization planted their signature ragged roses at the location. The park was officially dedicated on  January 11,2011 and is open from 10am-2pm 7 days a week.***

 

A view inside the Helen Yeagar Memorial Grove.

A view inside the Helen Yeagar Memorial Grove.

One of the landmark plaques for Victoria Avenue.

One of the landmark plaques for Victoria Avenue.

A view of the memorial garden and Roosevelt Palm Tree.

A view of the memorial garden and Roosevelt Palm Tree.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Theodore Roosevelt: “Address at Riverside, California,” May 7, 1903. Online by Gerhard Peters and John T. Woolley, The American Presidency Project. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=97709.

**Patterson, Tom .”Landmarks of Riverside and the stories behind them”.Riverside, CA: Press-Enterprise, 1964.

***Smith, Jeff. “The Helen Hays Yeagar Memorial Grove.” Victoria Avenews 21 (Jan. 2013): 1. Print.

Devine House: City of Riverside Landmark #30

Location: 4475 Twelfth Street
Date Established: 6/2/1888
Date Visited: 6/20/2014

A side view of the Devine home.

A side view of the Devine home.

A front view of the Devine home.

A front view of the Devine home.

The Devine house was established in 1888, when after being married for one year Frank and Vinie Devine moved into there then recently completed Queen Anne Style home.

Frank Devine was born in 1848 in Rochester, New York. He was a good student and studied be a clerk and a bookkeeper. In 1870 he moved to New York and continued working for different businesses in New York. It was there he met his first wife was Miss Annie Moran (who died in 1877). In 1882 he moved to Los Angeles and worked for the German Fruit Company who made Frank Devine their general manager of their newly opened branch in Riverside in 1885. *

Sunbeam Orange Crate Label (Riverside Public Library)

Sunbeam Orange Crate Label (Riverside Public Library)

Business went well and in May of 1887 Frank Devine and John Boyd formed a business partnership and bought out the business and started exporting citrus under the famous “Sunbeam” label. As business grew Frank Devine became a big supporter of local institutions in Riverside, especially the Catholic Church of whom he was a member. One of the organizations in which Frank Devine was a founding member was the Victoria Club which was organized in 1889 and incorporated in 1903. The business had a bit of a problem in 1891 when John Boyd died suddenly and his estate was not to go to his wife in Riverside but to John Boyd’s first wife (whom he did not officially divorce) in Canada. Luckily, the house was in Vinie Devine’s name and Frank Devine was able to reorganize his export business as “The Frank B. Devine Company.” Frank Devine continued to work in the citrus industry until his death in 1923 and his wife lived in the house until her death in 1942.**

Golfers at the Box Springs course. 1898

Golfers at the Box Springs course. 1898

Besides the Devine family other notable people living in the home were Dr. Homer Chapman who was chemist at UCR boarding in the home, Clifford Brown who bought the home in 1947 and made some additions in the backyard, and Terry Bridges who was an attorney from Best, Best, and Krieger (currently a large law firm in Riverside) who bought the home in 1970. **

 

 

* An Illustrated History of Southern California embracing the counties of San Diego San Bernardino Los Angeles and Orange and the peninsula of lower California. The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1890. AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 22 June 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/california/biography-of-frank-b-devine.htm – Last updated on Sep 22nd, 2011

** Adobes, Bungalows, and Mansions of Riverside, California. Rubidoux Printing, Riverside, California, 1985

 

 

The Jarvis House: Riverside City Landmark #78

Location: 4492 12 St.
Date Established:6/2/1888
Date Visited:6/20/2014

A front view of the Jarvis House decorated for the 4th of July.

A front view of the Jarvis House decorated for the 4th of July.

According to the book Landmarks of Riverside (pg. 59) there was a real estate boom in 1887. The Jarvis house began in May of 1887 when according to San Bernardino County Recorder’s Records, Emil Rosenthal sold his house plans and seven lots to John T. Jarvis. Emil Rosenthal and John Jarvis met by way of John Jarvis’ brother Dr. Joseph Jarvis, who had arrived in Riverside in 1877.

 

John T. Jarvis  (March 10, 1847 – January 3, 1932)

John T. Jarvis
(March 10, 1847 – January 3, 1932)

John Jarvis is best known in Riverside for being a city councilman in Riverside for 12 years and being the mayor of Riverside from 1926 to 1927. Before going into politics John Jarvis was first and foremost a business man. He helped start many companies including the Royal Steam Laundry, Citizens Bank, and the J. T. Jarvis & Company (which later became Rouse’s Department Store).

Despite being a descent real estate agent and horticulturalist John Jarvis was negatively affected by the bad turn in the housing market in 1887. The house cost $10,000 dollars at the time to finish and was constructed by a man named Charles T. Rice. Unfortunately by the time it was finished there was no money to furnish it according to the story published in the Riverside Press and Horticulturalist.

A frontal view of the Jarvis house in 1920. Riverside Municipal Museum archive.

A frontal view of the Jarvis house in 1920. Riverside Municipal Museum archive.

According to the book Adobes, Bungalows, and Mansions of Riverside the house was changed in July of 1914 from a Victorian Gothic style house to a bungalow style house.

The house today looks a lot like it does in it’s 1920′s picture. The only difference is that of the wrap around porch which has definitely been modified (and the trees have changed). While the official address is on 12th St., the house is easier viewed from it’s cross street of Redwood Drive.

A view of the Jarvis house from Redwood Dr.

A view of the Jarvis house from Redwood Dr.

A front view of the Jarvis House decorated for the 4th of July.

A front view of the Jarvis House decorated for the 4th of July.

Cressman House: Riverside City Landmark #37

Location: 3390 Orange Street
Date Established: 8/15/1902
Date Visited: 5/12/14

A side view of the Cressman House.

A side view of the Cressman House.

The Cressman house came from the designs of Los Angeles based architects Burnham and Bliesner, who also designed the Riverside County Courthouse. The home was finished in 1902 and is done in a Mission Revival style design.

The two story building was built for Charles H. Cressman who was a Sheriff Deputy. According to the book Adobes, Bunglows, and Mansions of Riverside, California (by Klotz and Hall) Mrs. Cressman and his family did not live in the house very long and moved out in 1908.

The grave of Herman John Wickman (1878-1938) in Evergreen Memorial.

The grave of Herman John Wickman (1878-1938) in Evergreen Memorial.

The home has had a lot of owners over the years. It seems that the longest owners of the home were Dr. and Mrs. Herman Wickman who lived there for 30 years (Klotz & Hall, 1985, p. 140-141.). Mr. Wickman . Evergreen Memorial records show that Dr. Wickman was a well known doctor in Riverside who died in 1938. It continued to change hands and by 2012 was sold by foreclosure to a civil attorney named Boyd F. Jensen who set about renovating the property to be used as a law firm office (Press Enterprise, RIVERSIDE: Historic home restored as law firm, 2/21/14) .

 

A front view of the Cressman House.

A front view of the Cressman House.

A view from behind the Cressman house.

A view from behind the Cressman house.

Marcy Branch Library: Riverside City Landmark #124

Location: 3711 Central Avenue
Date Established: March 15, 1958
Date Visited: 6/14/14

Marcy Branch Library, 1959*

Marcy Branch Library, 1959*

According to the panel inside the new Marcy Branch library in “June of 1951, a committee representing the Parent-Teacher Association of Palm, Magnolia, and Jefferson Schools requested that the Riverside City and County Public Library (RCCPL) open a local branch to provide children’s material.” This would take time and money and so a temporary Magnolia Center Branch library was opened on December 10, 1951.

An invitation to the Magnolia Center Branch Library opening.**

An invitation to the Magnolia Center Branch Library opening.**

A picture of Charles Frances Marcy at the Mission Inn Bell garden. **

A picture of Charles Frances Marcy at the Mission Inn Bell garden. **

The Magnolia Center Branch Library was an instant hit and circulation soared, but there was still not enough money to build a permanent structure. Wanting to help Riverside’s youth, Charles Frances Marcy stepped in and made a very generous bequest to start construction of the library. More importantly, he lobbied on the library’s side and convinced city council to appropriate additional funds to finish the project.

Riverside Police Department, 1965*

Riverside Police Department, 1965*

The focus of the building would be on youth and would therefore require some new ideas. Undertaking the requirements, Herman O. Ruhnau was retained to draft the design of the building. Herman O. Ruhnau’s legacy comes from the many buildings he designed in Riverside. In addition to the Marcy Branch Library he designed the current city hall, the police department, La Sierra High School, and the County Administrative Center. For the Marcy Branch he chose a circular design that attracted national attention. From a design perspective it was genius because it allowed lots of light to go into the room, which saved on electricity. Also noted in the building was the use of beams, which was popular at the time.

The children's section of Marcy Branch Library 1959.**

The children’s section of Marcy Branch Library 1959.**

The adult section of the old Marcy Branch Library.

The adult section of the old Marcy Branch Library.

The old check-in desk at the old Marcy Branch library with recessed lighting.

The old check-in desk at the old Marcy Branch library with recessed lighting.

A view of the curves of the old Marcy Branch Library.

A view of the curves of the old Marcy Branch Library.

A side view of the old Marcy Branch Library today (6/14/14).

A side view of the old Marcy Branch Library today (6/14/14).

Some trees still in bloom at the old Marcy Branch.

Some trees still in bloom at the old Marcy Branch.

 

It was interesting to me the that bathrooms for this building were outside.

It was interesting to me the that bathrooms for this building were outside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2011, the City of Riverside decided to move the Marcy Branch library to it’s current address of 6927 Magnolia Avenue. The current building used to be a Automobile Association of America Office. The new building is two stories with about 18,000 square feet of space, which makes it vastly more expandable than the old library. There is no current occupant for the old Marcy Branch. It is hoped that in naming the building a city landmark the building will be preserved.

The driveway of the new Marcy Branch Library.

The driveway of the new Marcy Branch Library.

A frontal view of the new Marcy Branch Library.

A frontal view of the new Marcy Branch Library.

A plaque dedicating the new Marcy Branch library in 2011.

A plaque dedicating the new Marcy Branch library in 2011.

A display teaches about water about the new Marcy Branch Library children's section.

A display teaches about water about the new Marcy Branch Library children’s section.

A painting of orange trees inside the new Marcy Branch Library.

A painting of orange trees inside the new Marcy Branch Library.

A tile mosaic inside the New Marcy Branch Library.

A tile mosaic inside the New Marcy Branch Library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The story corner of the new Marcy Branch Library.

The story corner of the new Marcy Branch Library.

New self-checkout counters at the new Marcy Branch Library.

New self-checkout counters at the new Marcy Branch Library.

Computers at the new Marcy Branch library.

Computers at the new Marcy Branch library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Used by permission from the Ruhnau Ruhnau Clarke Architectural Firm.
** As seen in the New Marcy Branch Library.